Back Pain

Category: Defense system

Back to conditions

Tightness and pain in the mid-back and lower back, scoliosis, disc problems and sciatica.


Videos (4)

Video #1

Video #2

Video #3

Video #4


Audio (1)

  • Back Pain

Questions & Answers (2)

Question 1:

"When I stand in front of a mirror, I can see that my head, shoulders and pelvis look uneven or tilted. Can this be corrected? "

Answer 1:

Yes it can. If you look at the human body, particularly the cranium/head, the shoulders, and the hip area, you will see that there are actually three pelvises, not one. The jaw bones that come together would be similar to your two collar bones coming together, and your pubic bones coming together. There are two round flat bones in the side of your head beneath the skin of your ears that move opposite to each other when you breathe. They are called the temporal bones. They would be analogous to your flat round shoulder blades or scapulae which move in a counter rotating manner, and your two flat round ileum bones which move counter to each other. You have a triangular bone at the back of your head called the occiput bone. It moves back and forth when you breathe, as does your triangular sternum in the front of your chest, and the triangular sacrum at the base of your spine. There are 4 circuits or sensors (2 on the front and 2 on the back) found in each of the three “pelvises”. If they are all calibrated to each other, they send information to the brain as to their location in space. The brain then calculates and decides which nerves it is going to send energy through, to stimulate the muscles of the head, neck, shoulders, and pelvis. This is done for one purpose only, which is to keep the animal as centered (plumb line) and upright against gravity as possible. If the person has ever struck their head or shoulders, fallen on their head or pelvis, or been struck/checked really hard from the side as in sports/car accidents, the calibration of any or all of the 12 points can become disorganized. The body will do its best to maintain plumb line/center of gravity between the jaw (the cranial pelvis) and the pubic bone (the body pelvis). It will intelligently do this by stimulating one side of the musculature more than the other side, causing the spine to pull or curve out of true center. Remember, it is doing this to maintain the head centered over the pelvis, at all expense. Without this compensatory mechanism you would be in severe pain, immobile, or even dead within a short time. This is why the muscles of one side of the neck, shoulder, or pelvis will pull more than the other, giving the appearance of one side tilting or being higher. This will change the length of one’s stride or “gait” when walking, and can be a main reason for why people wear out their shoes or heels more on one side than the other. It can be the reason why a person can be very strong with one arm or leg, but not with the other. A “gait fault” as we call it, is extremely common in most people, and fairly easy to correct in one treatment. It is as if the body program or motion picture in the brain is frozen in one frame where one arm and the opposite leg are extended forward (as in walking or your gait). Even though you may look like your standing straight with your legs together in centre, your neurology is really firing only one arm muscle group and the opposite leg group. If you watch people when they stand, many will have to lean over onto one hp when they stand or sit. They cannot stand on both feet very long without shifting their weight. This is a sign of a gait fault. It is largely responsible for why people can have a good back swing/kick in baseball, golf or other sports, but a poor fore swing. Of course if the gait fault is the reverse, they will have a good fore swing but a less than excellent back swing. It can be the cause of repetitive sprains, strains, muscle tightness, and spinal curvatures. Many people who present with a minor curvature in their spine are being misdiagnosed with having a “scoliosis”. In medical literature, about 85% of these are labeled as “idiopathic scoliosis”. Idiopathic literally translates into “origin unknown”! I find it very disturbing that information founded by chiropractors and chiropractic kinesiologists regarding the treatment of the body is being purposely ignored by the mainstream health “authorities”. Yet this same mainstream group can justify breaking segments of the spine, inserting rods into children to straighten the “appearance” of the spine (but really not addressing the “cause”, (as I have just explained) for a condition which is 85% idiopathic. They shouldn’t tamper with it if they don’t know or are refusing to listen to other approaches outside of their box of thinking. Please understand that there are cases of severe spinal malformations from genetic defects, etc, but more needs to be learned by parents and doctors alike before going to the most extreme treatment first.

Question 2:

"I am an athlete and notice that during my baseball, tennis and golf swings, my body always pulls a little at the end of the swing, causing me to hook the ball and not get as much power in my swing. Sometimes muscles in either my neck or my low back will spasm after the swing. What does this tell you?"

Answer 2:

It tells me that your nervous system is misfiring and that your structure or frame is possibly out of alignment. More than likely you have a gait fault and/or a scoliosis ( see videos back pain and on scoliosis). This can be corrected, returning to your optimum game performance.


Testimonials (2)

I am almost holding my breath waiting for the pain to return to my lower back!  normal person!  After returning to my office (I think I floated back and I wanted to cry about 3 times en route with happiness, awe, and shock) I was pain free (I haven’t used that term in over 3 years).  Today, even more so, in fact it is not hurting as I write this AND my digestive tract has been active for the past 2 days!  That blows my mind if that should continue as well!!!!

Thank you so much

Suzanne - New York NY, USA
01/07/2009

Darcy Keenan - Ottawa, Canada
01/06/2020