Hip Pain & Degeneration

Category: Defense system

Back to conditions

If the neurology is disorganized to the musculature of the pelvis and legs, walking, running, jumping, surfing or biking will be an effort and will wear down the structure over years. The degeneration may not appear on X-ray until many years until the disorganization started. Why wait until then?


Videos (3)

Video #1

Video #2

Video #3


Audio (1)

  • Hip Pain and Degeneration

Questions & Answers (3)

Question 1:

"When I stand in front of a mirror, I can see that my head, shoulders and pelvis look uneven or tilted. Can this be corrected? "

Answer 1:

Yes it can. If you look at the human body, particularly the cranium/head, the shoulders, and the hip area, you will see that there are actually three pelvises, not one. The jaw bones that come together would be similar to your two collar bones coming together, and your pubic bones coming together. There are two round flat bones in the side of your head beneath the skin of your ears that move opposite to each other when you breathe. They are called the temporal bones. They would be analogous to your flat round shoulder blades or scapulae which move in a counter rotating manner, and your two flat round ileum bones which move counter to each other. You have a triangular bone at the back of your head called the occiput bone. It moves back and forth when you breathe, as does your triangular sternum in the front of your chest, and the triangular sacrum at the base of your spine. There are 4 circuits or sensors (2 on the front and 2 on the back) found in each of the three “pelvises”. If they are all calibrated to each other, they send information to the brain as to their location in space. The brain then calculates and decides which nerves it is going to send energy through, to stimulate the muscles of the head, neck, shoulders, and pelvis. This is done for one purpose only, which is to keep the animal as centered (plumb line) and upright against gravity as possible. If the person has ever struck their head or shoulders, fallen on their head or pelvis, or been struck/checked really hard from the side as in sports/car accidents, the calibration of any or all of the 12 points can become disorganized. The body will do its best to maintain plumb line/center of gravity between the jaw (the cranial pelvis) and the pubic bone (the body pelvis). It will intelligently do this by stimulating one side of the musculature more than the other side, causing the spine to pull or curve out of true center. Remember, it is doing this to maintain the head centered over the pelvis, at all expense. Without this compensatory mechanism you would be in severe pain, immobile, or even dead within a short time. This is why the muscles of one side of the neck, shoulder, or pelvis will pull more than the other, giving the appearance of one side tilting or being higher. This will change the length of one’s stride or “gait” when walking, and can be a main reason for why people wear out their shoes or heels more on one side than the other. It can be the reason why a person can be very strong with one arm or leg, but not with the other. A “gait fault” as we call it, is extremely common in most people, and fairly easy to correct in one treatment. It is as if the body program or motion picture in the brain is frozen in one frame where one arm and the opposite leg are extended forward (as in walking or your gait). Even though you may look like your standing straight with your legs together in centre, your neurology is really firing only one arm muscle group and the opposite leg group. If you watch people when they stand, many will have to lean over onto one hp when they stand or sit. They cannot stand on both feet very long without shifting their weight. This is a sign of a gait fault. It is largely responsible for why people can have a good back swing/kick in baseball, golf or other sports, but a poor fore swing. Of course if the gait fault is the reverse, they will have a good fore swing but a less than excellent back swing. It can be the cause of repetitive sprains, strains, muscle tightness, and spinal curvatures. Many people who present with a minor curvature in their spine are being misdiagnosed with having a “scoliosis”. In medical literature, about 85% of these are labeled as “idiopathic scoliosis”. Idiopathic literally translates into “origin unknown”! I find it very disturbing that information founded by chiropractors and chiropractic kinesiologists regarding the treatment of the body is being purposely ignored by the mainstream health “authorities”. Yet this same mainstream group can justify breaking segments of the spine, inserting rods into children to straighten the “appearance” of the spine (but really not addressing the “cause”, (as I have just explained) for a condition which is 85% idiopathic. They shouldn’t tamper with it if they don’t know or are refusing to listen to other approaches outside of their box of thinking. Please understand that there are cases of severe spinal malformations from genetic defects, etc, but more needs to be learned by parents and doctors alike before going to the most extreme treatment first.

Question 2:

"I notice my shoes wear down unevenly. Does this tell you anything about my body and can you help?"

Answer 2:

With falls, accidents, traumas, and sports injuries, the body can lose its calibration of where is the head in relation to the shoulders and in relation to the pelvis. If disorganized, the neurology will do everything it can to maintain center of gravity by stimulating the musculature of one side of the body more than the other, causing the spine to pull or curve out of true center. This is why the muscles of one side of the neck, shoulder, or pelvis will pull more than the other, giving the appearance of one side tilting or being higher. It is usually the reason why a person can be very strong with one arm or leg, but not with the other. This will change the length of one’s stride or “gait” when walking, and can be a main reason for why people wear out their shoes or heels more on one side than the other and appear to have one leg shorter than the other. It will affect the hips, knees, ankles and feet over time, leading to instability and sprain/strain which does not seem to get better over time. Many with this condition cannot stand on both feet or sit for very long without shifting their weight to one side. These are all signs and symptoms of a gait fault which is extremely common in most people, and fairly easy to correct. Many people who present with a minor curvature in their spine are being misdiagnosed with having a “scoliosis” when really it is a gait fault only. See section on scoliosis to understand it’s cause.

Question 3:

"My ankle always twists even though I have had chiropractic adjustments, use orthotics in my shoes, and built up the muscles of my legs and ankles at the gym. Is there something neurological that could be going on?"

Answer 3:

Definitely. What you have tried to do so far is great; however, there is probably neural disorganization of your gait mechanism and balance centers and how communicate neurologically to the legs and ankles. If the top system is disorganized (ie; the cranium), the ankles are taking the brunt of the weight being at the bottom, overcompensating to keep everything upright.